Electric Human Suit

Droll rat, they would shoot you if they knew
Your cosmopolitan sympathies

268 notas

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
As the Musée d’Orsay writes, Jean-Léon Gérôme—painter of this, The Carpet Merchant, in 1887—is “a very unorthodox academic painter, [who]…knew how to represent history as a dramatic spectacle and, by creating particularly convincing images, could make the spectator an eyewitness to events ranging from Classical antiquity to his own times.”
Fitting as the description is, it might seem incongruous to call Gérome an “unorthodox” academic painter—after all, he was one of the last ardent defenders of academism. 
Perhaps, though, his very willingness to remix the academic tradition, to apply its style and standards to his eclectic subjects, was what sustained his—and his audience’s—interest.

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

As the Musée d’Orsay writes, Jean-Léon Gérôme—painter of this, The Carpet Merchant, in 1887—is “a very unorthodox academic painter, [who]…knew how to represent history as a dramatic spectacle and, by creating particularly convincing images, could make the spectator an eyewitness to events ranging from Classical antiquity to his own times.”

Fitting as the description is, it might seem incongruous to call Gérome an “unorthodox” academic painter—after all, he was one of the last ardent defenders of academism.

Perhaps, though, his very willingness to remix the academic tradition, to apply its style and standards to his eclectic subjects, was what sustained his—and his audience’s—interest.

(vía radiofreemars)

Etiquetas 19th century art painting orientalism Gérôme